big glass cutter for a small space

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aceframer
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big glass cutter for a small space

Post by aceframer » Sat 11 Mar, 2017 3:52 pm

I do a lots of large mirrors which I buy in cut as my wall mounted cutter only does 1600mm, but they often turn up broken and replacing them against tight deadlines means being at risk of losing orders. I need to cut 1830mm high sheets so I can keep them in stock, but alas I only have a max height in the workshop of 2450mm - I enquired about the keencut ST210 but the overrun makes it to tall and when I spoke to them they didnt seem to keen about it being mounted with the bottom out to make it fit - anyone know of one that will fit the bill ?

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Re: big glass cutter for a small space

Post by JFeig » Sun 12 Mar, 2017 1:27 pm

That does not compute. Cutters on factory made tripod stands have the have the material at an angled plane from the wall. If a tripod has the material @ 20° from the wall Why can't it be set to 30°. I would make sure the the feet of the cutter are secured to the floor to prevent any movement as well as the top.
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Re: big glass cutter for a small space

Post by IFGL » Sun 12 Mar, 2017 1:33 pm

See all those doubters were wrong, Pythagoras Theorem is useful.

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prospero
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Re: big glass cutter for a small space

Post by prospero » Sun 12 Mar, 2017 4:31 pm

I've seen lads at a glass company grab 4x6' sheets, drop them on a bench and slice them up with a hand-held cutter.

You could rig up your own cutter using a sheet of thick chipboard with a bit of bracing on the back. Face it with carpet and lean
it against the wall. Make a little shelf with a gap for the glass to rest on. You don't actually need the captive cutter block. Use a
plank of laminated chipboard as a guide and use a hand-held cutter. Rubber pads on the back for non-slippness. Sorted.
You could engineer a measuring scale but just as easy to measure/mark.

Not as slick as a proper machine but does the same and heck of a lot cheaper, plus it you could make it fit. :D
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Re: big glass cutter for a small space

Post by Jamesnkr » Mon 13 Mar, 2017 9:41 am

prospero wrote:Not as slick as a proper machine but does the same and heck of a lot cheaper, plus it you could make it fit. :D
The lads at a glass cutting place would laugh at our 'proper' machines as being fit only for big girls blouses... Watching them cut glass is extraordinary.

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Steve N
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Re: big glass cutter for a small space

Post by Steve N » Mon 13 Mar, 2017 1:21 pm

With large wall cutters, is that you need space for them, not just hight, but at the sides to load the mirror, also you can only have the height as high as you can reach ,or use a step ladder :sweating: if I was doing a lot, I go along with how prospero suggested, and if doing the same size mirrors, I would make a template, so load the mirror, lay the template on top, score, break, or do the same but on a bench which is how I do it, I have a wooded batten screwed to one end of the bench, lay the glass/mirror down, pushed against the wooden batten, lay down the template down on top of the glass(against the batten) score down the edge of the template, then break , this is how we cut all our glass for our readymades. The glass for the readymades is cut from the leftovers when cutting the glass for the custom framing, I have the templates at hand when cutting all the weeks worth of glass for custom framing
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