Numatic stapler for box frame slips

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Cyrus
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Numatic stapler for box frame slips

Post by Cyrus » Mon 21 Mar, 2022 1:03 pm

Hello there can anyone recommend a stapler with the perfect nose for fixing in spacers when box framing to use with compressor. Have asked DJ Simons a couple of times over the years with no joy but believe there must be a product out there somewhere?????

Many thanks in advance Cyrus

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Gesso&Bole
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Re: Numatic stapler for box frame slips

Post by Gesso&Bole » Mon 21 Mar, 2022 1:23 pm

I use a headless pin gun for this, with some small blobs of glue. It's also useful for numerous other tasks around the workshop.

This is the one I got https://www.axminstertools.com/axminste ... 0mm-107613 but it looks like it is out of stock - sure there are similar products available
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Re: Numatic stapler for box frame slips

Post by Not your average framer » Mon 21 Mar, 2022 1:48 pm

I have various pneumatic staplers and brad nailers. I bought mine from places like Axminster Tools and Machine Mart. Firstly Using staples fix spacers into box frames may be a problem when You need to remove the spacer to replace, or clean the glass and maybe this is something to consider. I don't use saples to secure my box frame spacers, but all four spacer lengths are joined at the corners are are a loose sliding fit inside the frame, with a piece of mountboard together with the backing board fixed in place in the normal way to retain the spacers and the glass in place.

I also use narrow crown staples and a narrow crown pneumatic sapler to fit and glue stacked mouldings one inside another to create all one frame profile. This is O.K. because there is not a reason why the different stacked mouldings would ever need to be separated at a later point in time. I use the following range of pneumatic saplers and brad nailers:-

A narrow crown stapler. (hidden fixings for stacked moulding frame)
A wide crown stapler. (For fixing canvases to stretcher bars)
A 18 guage brad nailer. (for various woodwork and framing work)
And a 23 gauge headless pinner. (for adding fixings which need to be hidden under exterior handfinishing)

The headless pinner fires the headless pins slightless below the surface of the wood, which completely hides the pins from being visable at all, after the handfinishing has been completed. I hope that this is helpful.

BTW, my !8 gauge brad nailer can fire brad nails upto 50mm long and it very helpful and effective for fixing wooden rear frame sections onto the rear of ordinary frame mouldings, to increase their available depth,so that they can be used as box frames. I also use the same brad nailer to fire throgh the sides of display boxes to secure shelves inside of display boxes and display cases, or fit pediment pieces to the tops of frames. I also repair loose corners on old antique frame which need gluing and pinning back together. For me pins and staples act as internal clamps, which hold things in place while waiting for glue to set, thus saving valuable production time.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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Re: Numatic stapler for box frame slips

Post by Not your average framer » Mon 21 Mar, 2022 2:03 pm

There are times when I need to produce larger deep box frame and I produce these as a stacked moulding frames which is gluded and brad nailed from in side the frame to strengthen the front of the frame and make it more rubust and durable. Many of my mirror frames are also stacked moulding frames, with inset cubby holes below the mirror and adding individual inner stacked sections, produces something which does not look like an after thought! These extra sections are also glue and brad nailed in place.

I don't have a great deal of success selling normal framed mirrors, but mirrors with shelves, inset cubby holes, dowels as coat hooks, things like that very much help these to sell. Small matching mirrors, with shelves as pairs can create a bit of added customer interest as well. I am slowly using up several large secondhand sheets of mirror glass, which were given to me when a local fruit and veg shop closed down and this greatly reduces my costs, when producing framed mirrors. They do create plenty of attention, although the do sell, it is still a matter of waiting for the right customer to come along!
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

Not your average framer
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Location: Devon, U.K.
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Location: Glorious Devon

Re: Numatic stapler for box frame slips

Post by Not your average framer » Mon 21 Mar, 2022 2:44 pm

I have the same headless pinner as Jeremy has and I bought all four sizes of the headlless pins also from Axminster Tools. These pin size are 10mm, 12mm, 15mm and 20mm, I have found all four sizes to be useful. The headless pinner is very useful to produce almost completelly invisable fixings, which are very easily completely hidden when frames are hand finished! I run my headless pinner over pressure, to sink the headless pinds slightly below the surface of the wood. My headless pinner is one of the most useful tools, which I have ever bought!

I rip cut along some moulding off-cuts and left overs to get bits with interesting profiles to glue up to fit on to other stacked moulding frame sections in order to create interesting frame profiles and stuff like that. The smaller length headless pins are quite useful for fixing each stacked component while the glue sets and the pins act as little intenal clamps inside the stand moulding sections.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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