Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

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Not your average framer
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Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by Not your average framer » Fri 06 May, 2022 12:51 pm

I am planing to re-purpose some low cost moulding for various specific uses and one of the necessary operations will be to cut new rebates. I don't want to spend too much time and fiddling about to do this. My original thoughts were to cut the rebates using an electric planner buried in a jig, so that the planner is completely well away from my fingers. Another thought was to cut the rebates with two cuts from my table saw, but much of the time these mouding will be pine and and the quality on the cuts will vary according to what the wood grain is doing.

Although I already have several routers and a budget rounter table, I am much less wanting to cut the rebate using a router, since I will need to do it in several passes and repositioning the router table settings for each pass of the router will add quite a lot of time to the whole process. So I was wondering how other forum member prefer to do cut their rebates. This would be much less bother if I was repurposing Obeche moulding as these always cut really nicely, whereas cutting pine moulding can be sometimes more problematic, when trying to get a really perfect finish on pine without using a router. Any recommendations would be gratefully received.
Thanks,
Mark.
Mark Lacey

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Re: Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by Gesso&Bole » Fri 06 May, 2022 1:45 pm

I don't bother. It takes too long.
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Re: Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by vintage frames » Fri 06 May, 2022 2:05 pm

Another way -
Cut the moulding you're interested in into the short purposed lengths.
Wrap them up in brown paper.
Print off a posting label from the Post Office web site.
Have the postman collect it from you.
Address it to fusionframer
and he will do any sort or size of rebate for you.
Affordable Gilding Course for Professional Framers-https://www.dermotmcardle.co.uk/
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Re: Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by prospero » Sat 07 May, 2022 12:47 am

I did this with my cheapo table saw and cheapo router table on a piece of 'construction' grade pine timber.
The rebate was formed with two passes. (riving knife and safety guards removed). I think I contrived a jig with
feather boards and guards so I could shove it through without any risk of touching the blade. The setup time was
significant.

DIYmldg003.jpg
The finish was going to be a 'driftwood' type which this timber is ideal for.

It was an interesting exercise academically speaking and I did use it on a 'real' job. But it has to be said that if I
I was wanting a cleaner finish I would have struggled.

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Re: Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by Not your average framer » Sat 07 May, 2022 10:09 am

Thanks Peter,

I have been thinking about this for quite a long time. I have even been thinking about using a thin kerf blade, possibly with lots of teeth, but thin kerf blade are easy to over heat and distort the blade. It's definitely going to be a slow job, if I am going to be taking multiple passes with a router. I do have a hand held electric planner which came supplied with a rebating attachment, but I would prefer to use this as part of an enclosed jig, with a fence to set the distance from the moulding to the planner. Since the planner is designed to produce smooth finishes, this occurs to me that this might be the smart move. My thinking so far has been to have the fence and safety sheild forming a tunnel in which the planner is located and a vacuum cleaner attached as a dust extractor in the middle so that it sucks air from both ends of the tunnel. I am thinking that with the airflow coming in from both directions, that the would be no where for any dust particles to go except only to the vacuum cleaner.

I am still thinking about getting a thin kerf blade as the moulding I am wanting to use already has a rebated end and I would like to use that end including the rebate as a nice square section 20mm x 20mm moulding. It would be a simple matter to cut up the saw cut on the surface planning table. I am really very much in favour of square mouldings which as deep as they are wide, as I thinks that they are quite a popular and trendy look. This way I get two different mouldings out of one moulding and this creates better value for money and does not waste the existing rebate and sight edge. I have a 1/4 inch corner beading router bit, which will cut a nice bit of detail onto the deeper mouldings sight edge and it produces a bead with a flat at both ends of the bead, One flat is vertical and the other flat is horizontal. The flat section at the bottom on the sight edge would only need to be a thin edge as the rest of the bead provide the necessary support and I am guessing that the resulting rebate depth will be about 18mm deep, which is quite a useful size.

My overall material costs for both moulding will average out at about 40 pence per foot and I enables me to have two moulding profile which I have wanted for a long time, havebeen unable to other wise obtain at all, without getting them specially machined to order. I was given an older router and four high speed steel never used Bosch router bits, of which one of these is the router bit, which I have already mentioned, and I am intending to to have this router permanently set up with this very same bit, using off cuts and scraps of wood to produce a dedicated router jig and feather boards, which is ready to go when I need to use it at a moments notice. I have quite a significant stock of bare wood pine moulding, but one, of two are a bit limited in overall depth and could do with a bit more gravitas and as a result these other two moulding possibilities, will provide some other options with the necessary gravitas. As a result of these current financially less easy times, it is very important to be playing to my best standards as much as I am able to do.

My two less exciting mouldings are O.K. for more basic jobs even sometimes for use creating stacked mouldings, but they are not so much where I want to be going in the future. Unfortunately, I bought 200 feet each of these more basic mouldings just as they were talking about the first lock down. I was an uncertain time and I just wanted to be adequately stock when I would be able to re-open my business. I have also got a good stock of various sizes of low cost flat pine mouldings make deep box sections to fit into the backs of these more basic moulding to make box frames if necessary. Cheap basic box frames tend to be quite popular for me. They tick over quite nicely, but they are not aiming at the big money market and the better quality, better money market is much more that which keeps my business alive, but it's nice to have some more basic stuff to fill in between the more worthwhile jobs. In recent years I have learnt to play both ends of the market, my once always busy town is not always that busy all the time and I need to network with some trade customers who are often buying to resell and things like that.
Mark Lacey

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Re: Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by JFeig » Sat 07 May, 2022 3:21 pm

I agree with Peter's method.
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Re: Any thoughts about cutting rebates in mouldings.

Post by Not your average framer » Sat 07 May, 2022 3:55 pm

Yes, Jerome,

I think so too! I'm intending to get a better table saw, which looks like being a 10 inch bladed Bosch professional range table saw. I already have a 60 tooth teflon coated blade which will fit the arbor diameter on that saw, so I'm thinking that a 60 tooth blade should produce a fairly nice quality of cut. Unfortunately a high tooth count is not idea for rip cutting, so I am thinking that cutting in several passes to avoid overloading the gullets on the saw blade and creating to much heat is probably going to be a wise move. Another possibility is to cut the rebate in one go with a comination type blade of about 40 teeth and clean up to full size with the 60 tooth blade taking a final finishing cut.

My thanks to everyone for your suggestions and thoughts, it has been very helpful to me!
Thanks,
Mark.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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