Glass cutting when you start framing

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Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby cleaver » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:07 pm

Hi Folks – I hope today is treating you well.

I’d like to get your thoughts on glass cutting without big equipment (e.g. Excaliber 5000 etc)

I see places like Wessex supply/deliver cut to exact size – any comments on going that way, just to start with? Does it add fortunes to in-cost....and what other downsides are there?

I guess the cheapest way is with a high-quality pen-type cutter. Does doing it that way result in a lot more waste (as the cut edges on used sheets may not be dead straight/square)?

I see that one of the pricier Logan mount cutters (701?) also cuts glass (with a different cutting head!). Anyone got any knowledge on that machine, please. Must say, my instinct as a newbie is to be nervous of something that cuts glass and mount board in the same area.

I’ve used a similar to the Excalbur and, space and dosh permitting, I’d get one in a heartbeat. But, to start, I’d have to go a more basic route. I’d really appreciate your advice on how you’d approach this (and how you did when you started off).

Thanks :)
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby David McCormack » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:55 pm

Hi Dan,

If you have an account with Wessex then you should sign up on their website to be an online member and then you can use their 'glass cut to size calculator' to get prices for any size/material.

It is more expensive to get glass cut to size, but to get going when starting out could be a good move depending on the size of your workshop etc. Full sheets are 48 x 36 inches so you need good space to handle and store the glass safely.

I cut all my glass by hand on a carpeted sloping bench using a Toyo cutter and straight edge. Perfect cuts every time and very square :D Finish your edges with a Telum hand pad.
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby prospero » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:57 pm

The main thing with glass cutting is having a good surface to work on, preferably on dedicated to the job.
It should be solid and flat and covered with short-pile carpet.

Next is a good straightedge. A proper glass cutter's T-square is handy.

As for the cutters themselves, there are lots of (expensive) bells'n'whistles ones but a good quality 6-wheeler will
serve you well. I used Silberschnitt ones for years and they do the job well . :D

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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby cleaver » Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:11 pm

Thanks for the quick replies, guys. :clap:

Reassuring to know 'hand cutting' is pretty normal, and that you can get such great results.....when you know what you're doing.

I'm sure my initial jobs will be oil paintings (no glass!), but of course I want to get my 3 brain cells around the logistics of glass (esp, when setting out work space).

This forum is the absolute bee's knees (as a stand-up once said: "Who decided the best part of bees was their knees?" :D ).
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby JFeig » Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:57 pm

One thing to remember about glass cutting tools. The little wheels that actually cause the glass to fracture where you want it to fracture do wear out. These wheels run on a wire axle that has to be lubricated. The cutters have to be lubricated every time you cut. Place the cutters in any small jar and place a wad of cotton or paper towel at the bottom then add lightweight oil to just cover the pad. I use 50% machine oil and 50% paint thinner. Wipe off the cutter just prior to cutting is there is excess oil.
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby Justintime » Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:40 pm

I have the Fletcher 3100, it was a considerable expense to start with, but it's one of my favourite tools.
I cut all my mounts to size with it, then undermount, backboard and glass with it. It really is worth the investment and plan it into the space design. It's the dogs bollocks!
Lions sell a bottle of wheel lubricant for glass cutting wheels. It's really important to keep the wheel lubricated.
Spend as much as you can afford on each tool, so you don't have to replace it in a year.
If you're serious about it, forget about Logan.
I chose Fletcher over Keencut purely on a design preference.
I would give Peter at Framers Equipment a call, he has some used Keencut and Fletcher cutters at the moment. He is a service engineer, so will refurb them before they go out.
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby cleaver » Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:20 am

Thanks again, all. So grateful to everyone who takes the time to educate me. :clap:
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby Ed209 » Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:43 am

You certainly notice a difference when you lubricant the wheel it makes a very satisfying sound as you cut.
I use the Lion lubricant it also claims to keep the cut warm and open longer or something like that!
I use a Fletcher 3100 and it’s brilliant, if I want a more precise square cut for mount board cutting I use my Keencut as the Fletcher can have a tendency to cause a slight curve sometimes due to slight bending/deflection of the blade/holder


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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby cleaver » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:56 pm

Ed209 wrote:You certainly notice a difference when you lubricant the wheel it makes a very satisfying sound as you cut.
I use the Lion lubricant it also claims to keep the cut warm and open longer or something like that!
I use a Fletcher 3100 and it’s brilliant, if I want a more precise square cut for mount board cutting I use my Keencut as the Fletcher can have a tendency to cause a slight curve sometimes due to slight bending/deflection of the blade/holder


!-!



Sounds a bit 'Silence of the Lambs' to me! :twisted:
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby Rainbow » Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:38 pm

Dan Smith wrote:I see places like Wessex supply/deliver cut to exact size – any comments on going that way, just to start with?

In terms of the overall job, cut-to-size float glass isn't that expensive, whether by Wessex or a local glass merchant. It might be worth going that way to start with.

I buy packs of standard-size float glass, and then cut it by hand to the exact size. For larger one-off pieces, I pop into to my local glass merchant for them to cut an exact size. I'm lucky in having a glass merchant nearby but you may not have that option.



Dan Smith wrote:I guess the cheapest way is with a high-quality pen-type cutter. Does doing it that way result in a lot more waste (as the cut edges on used sheets may not be dead straight/square)?

I'm not sure why the edges wouldn't be square if measured and cut correctly.

Because I have a selection of pack sizes, I simply use the nearest size to cut down from so there's very little wastage. I don't suppose it's as cost-efficient as using a huge sheet of glass to cut various sizes from, but I haven't got the space to store huge sheets of glass, and nor would I want to hand-cut huge sheets anyway.
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Re: Glass cutting when you start framing

Postby prospero » Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:13 am

When I started up, working from home I ordered 6 full sheets from a local glass merchant. When I say full sheets I
mean 6' x 4' :o . I thought I would cut them in two as they were a tad unwieldy. Good Idea. I laid the first sheet on the
kitchen floor and scored it. It broke perfectly. The other 5 sheets ended up as a lot of irregular triangles :lol: .

I learned two things from this experience: Kitchen floors may look flat, but they aren't. And don't buy cheap glass cutters. :roll:
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